San Francisco Saves Face

San Francisco Bans Facial Recognition Technology [NYT] –  The San Francisco Board of Supervisors on Tuesday enacted the first ban by a major city on the use of facial recognition technology by police and all other municipal agencies.

Similar bans are under consideration in Oakland and in Somerville, Mass., outside of Boston. In Massachusetts, a bill in the state legislature would put a moratorium on facial recognition and other remote biometric surveillance systems. On Capitol Hill, a bill introduced last month would ban users of commercial face recognition technology from collecting and sharing data for identifying or tracking consumers without their consent, although it does not address the government’s uses of the technology.

“This is really about saying we can have security without being a security state. We can have good policing without being a police state,” Peskin said at Tuesday’s Board of Supervisors meeting. “Part of that is building trust with the community.”

SF CRONICLE

This is a partial win as we need to see FRT either scoped user first or banned out right for commercial use nation wide.

Mercenaries Operating Zero-Click Tech [ft] (headline, mine) This “zero-click” technology — as NSO calls it — has proved big business. The company’s revenues have risen from $109m in 2014 to $251m in 2018, while Ebitda has soared from $60m to $128m over the same period. You can see why Novalpina’s Stephen Peel saw a business opportunity — even if it meant he had to step down from the board of international human rights group Global Witness.

Israel’s Eurovision webcast hacked with fake attack warning [FRANCE24] “At a certain point, there was a takeover — apparently by Hamas — of our digital broadcast,” KAN chief Eldad Koblenz said Wednesday.

FB Adds Restrictions to Live [fb]  We will now apply a ‘one strike’ policy to Live in connection with a broader range of offenses. From now on, anyone who violates our most serious policies will be restricted from using Live for set periods of time – for example 30 days – starting on their first offense. For instance, someone who shares a link to a statement from a terrorist group with no context will now be immediately blocked from using Live for a set period of time. (Just adopt broadcast rules – wtf , also we will not be able to see any of these once it goes into the crypto tunnel- ED)

AI at the Barbican: in the realm of mind games [ft] The problem with AI is not in the machinery, but in ourselves, in that we are not entirely sure what we are supposed to do with it. Most of the time, we get it to emulate what we are doing at the current moment. For example, we teach our ever-more-intelligent cars to drive. More ambitiously, we get it to do what we know we ought to do, but don’t want to do: to save money, to invest cleverly, to tidy things up. All very laudable aims — but how dull, how quotidian!

Live Stream Guide Festival de Cannes (Officiel) All Day.